OHS Insider Month in Review – September 2017: Saskatchewan

0
34

OHS Scorecard

Case volume has been high but fine levels low from August thru mid-September:

Fine Offender Offence(s)
$70,000 101186505 Saskatchewan Ltd. Failure to  ensure that the operator of powered mobile equipment wore a safety belt stemming from rollover death of packer driver
$40,000 Aallcann Wood Suppliers Inc. Failure to lock out wood peeler machine that activated severing a worker’s fingers
$20,000 Echo Lake Farms Ltd. Failure to maintain the minimum clearance distance between exposed energized electrical conductor and workers/ powered equipment resulting in worker injury
$5,600 The Energy Doctor Failure to ensure worker use of head, foot and fall protection or implement a written fall protection plan
$4,200 Cactus Roofing Ltd. Failure to ensure worker use of PPE and fall protection
$2,800 Xray Roofing Inc. Failure to ensure worker use of PPE and fall protection
$2,800 Mico Construction Failure to ensure worker use of PPE and fall protection
$2,800 Windel’s Roofing Failure to ensure worker use of head protection and fall protection
$2,800 Power Roofing Systems Failure to ensure worker use of head protection and fall protection
$2,800 Hilltop Construction Ltd. Failure to ensure worker use of head protection and fall protection
$2,100 Hebert Metal Roofing & Exteriors Ltd. Failure to report work injury requiring hospitalization to OHS within 72 hours

 

Workers’ Compensation—Work-Related
Sept. 1: The WCB revised the policy it uses (POL 12/2013) to determine if injuries are work-related. In addition to outlining the steps and information required to prove work-relatedness, the new policy specifies that Operations staff have discretion to accept claims even if they don’t have the complete medical record on file.

Workers’ Compensation—Benefits
Sept. 1: The WCB modified its policy on suspending benefits of workers who miss medical appointments or refuse to participate in a vocational plan. Key changes:

  • Benefits may be suspended if worker has pattern of casual absences
  • Workers may be eligible for other forms of employer support, e.g., sick leave or short-term disability, for casual absences
  • Workers’ comp benefits for casual absences will be suspended over period in which employer provides coverage.

Privacy
Aug. 8: Important notice to any of you that rely on genetic information to screen job applicants who may be prone to injury or illness. The Privacy Commissioner issued guidelines to make it clear that:

  • Your use, collection and disclosure of genetic information is subject to privacy law rules
  • You must keep any genetic information you collect secure

Genetic testing for pre-employment screening raises discrimination red flags especially if the information reveals conditions that may constitute disabilities