OHS Insider Month in Review – October 2017: Ontario

0
29

LAWS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

Fall Protection
Oct. 1: Effective today, all workers performing construction involving risk of vertical falls must complete a Chief Prevention Officer-approved working at heights training program, including experienced workers, i.e., those who’ve completed fall protection training before April 1, 2015.

OHS Scorecard
OHS fines in October (so far): 

Fine Offender Offence(s)
$115,000 Lafarge Canada Inc. Failure to lock out power supply to electrostatic precipitators during manual cleaning leading to electrical shock of contract worker
$95,000 Toronto Crane Service Inc. Failure to secure equipment against falling after crane tower in process of being dismantled tips and falls killing a worker
$90,000 Dayus Roofing Inc. Failure to ensure proper use of fall protection after young worker killed in fatal fall from roof that happened because he detached his lanyard from the safety line so he could get across the roof more easily
$70,000 FGF Brands Inc. Failure to lock out dough machine that started up during cleaning injuring the temp worker who was working inside
$60,000 Rex Pak Limited Failure to comply with MOL inspector orders to eliminate in-running nip hazards and pinch points of machinery on 9 production lines
$50,000

+

$3,500

Drummond Metal Fabrication Ltd.

+

Supervisor

Failure to properly guard metal-polishing lathe resulting in arm injury to temporary worker who was operating it; Supervisor fined for failing to ensure victim was wearing appropriate clothing while operating machine
$50,000 Thomson Construction Ltd. Failure to provide and ensure use of fall protection for roofing work resulting in worker’s fatal fall


OELs
Jan. 1: The following Occupational Exposure Limit changes take effect:

  • Newly established OELs for Cyanogen bromide, Ethyl isocyanate, Peracetic acid and Pheny isocyanate
  • Revised OELs for Acetone, Atrazine, Barium sulfate, Beryllium, 1-Bromopropane, Ethylidene norbornene, Lithium hydride, Methomyl, Methyl formate, Methyl isocyanate, Naphthalene, Nickel carbonyl, Oxalic Acid, Pentachlorophenol, Pentane, and Trichloroacetic acid, 1,2,3 – Trichloropropane and Triethylamine
  • Increase minimum oxygen content in formula for determining need for ventilation based on atmospheric pressure from 18% to 19.5%.

Hazardous Substances
Oct. 11: The MOL announced that it’s funding a study to review the impact of worker exposure to McIntyre Powder, an aluminum dust used in mines between 1943 and 1980. Workers were issued and told to breathe in the powder to protect against silicosis and other work-related lung diseases. If the study shows damage, affected workers will be in line for workers’ comp benefits.

OHS Inspections
Thanks to the MOL’s newly published 2017-18 Sector Plans, we now know the agency’s complete OHS inspection schedule from Jan. 1 to March 31, 2018:

Indust. Const. Mines Health Care Profess. Services
*Noise

*WHMIS

*Machine guard(1)

*Electrical(1)

*Ergonomics

*Outstanding rejected X-ray installation applications

*Temp foreign farm workers (2) *Golf courses (2)

*Noise

*WHMIS

*Ergonomics

*Fall protection

*Struck by hazards

*Outstanding rejected X-ray installation applications

*Electrical contact (2)

 

*Noise

*WHMIS

*Ergonomics

*PPE & high-visibility clothing

*Joint health & safety committees

*Ground control

*Mine hoist plants

*Engineering reviews (ground control, water management & ventilation)

*Outstanding rejected X-ray installation applications

* Four point-in-time (PIT) inspections(3)

*Health care sector enforcement initiative

*Noise

*WHMIS

*Ergonomics

*Outstanding rejected X-ray installation applications

*Open treatment dental X-ray sources at veterinary clinics

 

*Noise

*WHMIS

*Ergonomics

*Engineering reviews (ground control, water management & ventilation)

*Outstanding rejected X-ray installation applications

*Open treatment dental X-ray sources at veterinary clinics

 

 

 

Notes

(1) Ends Feb. 28, 2017
(2) Western Region only
(3) Northern Region only

Workers’ Compensation
Oct. 13: A couple of weeks after announcing that it’s reducing average premium rates for 2018 by 3.3%, the WSIB wrapped up its rate framework and premium setting policy consultations. Policies on the table include:

  • Allowing employers to carry more than one premium rate
  • Cutting the number of classification policies from 6 to 4, including a separate policy for temporary employment agencies
  • Cutting the number of premium adjustments and experience rating policies from 6 to 3.

Mental Stress
Oct.: The WSIB finalized changes making it easier for workers to get benefits for chronic mental stress, i.e., mental stress caused not by discrete traumatic events but “substantial work-related stressors, including bullying.” Effective Jan. 1, to qualify for coverage under Policy 15-03-14, workers must:

  • Get a professional diagnosis of mental stress injury based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
  • Prove they suffered a substantial work-related stressor(s) like bullying or harassment at work

Prove that the stressor was the predominant cause of the diagnosed mental stress injury.